Last edited by Vigal
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

6 edition of Adaptation to altitude-hypoxiain vertebrates found in the catalog.

Adaptation to altitude-hypoxiain vertebrates

Pierre Bouverot

Adaptation to altitude-hypoxiain vertebrates

by Pierre Bouverot

  • 82 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Springer-Verlag in Berlin, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Altitude, Influence of,
  • Anoxemia,
  • Adaptation (Physiology),
  • Vertebrates -- Physiology

  • Edition Notes

    StatementPierre Bouverot ; chapter 6 written in collaboration with C. Leray.
    SeriesZoophysiology -- v. 16
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQP82.2.A4
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21341043M
    ISBN 100387136029

      Canadian Journal of Zoology, , 93(5): , Adaptation to altitude-hypoxia in vertebrates. Springer-Verlag, Berlin. Storz JF, Scott GR, Cheviron ZA. Phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in vertebrates Cited by: 4. Comparative Vertebrate Neuroanatomy: Evolution and Adaptation, 2nd Edition. by Ann B. Butler, William Hodos August The Second Edition of this landmark text presents a broad survey of comparative vertebrate neuroanatomy at the introductory level, representing a unique contribution to the field of evolutionary neurobiology.

      Adaptation to Altitude-Hypoxia in Vertebrates Adaptation to altitude hypoxia is characterized by a variety offunctional changes which collectively facilitate oxygen trans­ port from the ambient medium to the cells of the : Alexis Jacquier.   In all vertebrates other than cyclostomes, the hemoglobin protein is a heterotetramer, composed of 2 ಱ-chain and 2 (β-chain polypeptides. In mammals and birds, the different subunit polypeptides are encoded by different sets of duplicated genes that are located on different chromosomes (Hardison ).Cited by:

    This volume originates from a symposium held in Copenhagen in June to commemorate Kjell Johansen, who died March 4, The volume begins with a nonscientific but fascinating glimpse at Kjell, followed by an overview of the kinds of physiology that interested him, i.e. adaptational, environme Category: Nature Physiological And Ecological Adaptations To Feeding In Vertebrates. High-altitude adaptation in humans is an instance of evolutionary modification in certain human populations, including those of Tibet in Asia, the Andes of the Americas, and Ethiopia in Africa, who have acquired the ability to survive at extremely high adaptation means irreversible, long-term physiological responses to high-altitude environments, associated with .


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Adaptation to altitude-hypoxiain vertebrates by Pierre Bouverot Download PDF EPUB FB2

: Adaptation to Altitude-Hypoxia in Vertebrates (Zoophysiology) (): Pierre Bouverot: BooksCited by: Buy Adaptation to Altitude-Hypoxia in Vertebrates (Zoophysiology) on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders Adaptation to Altitude-Hypoxia in Vertebrates (Zoophysiology): Bouverot, P., Leray, C.: : BooksCited by: About this book.

Adaptation to altitude hypoxia is characterized by a variety offunctional changes which collectively facilitate oxygen trans­ port from the ambient medium to the cells of the body. All of these changes can be seen at one Adaptation to altitude-hypoxiain vertebrates book or another in the course of hypoxic exposure.

Adaptation to altitude hypoxia is characterized by a variety offunctional changes which collectively facilitate oxygen trans­ port from the ambient medium to the cells of the body. All of these changes can be seen at one time or another in the course of hypoxic exposure.

Adaptation to altitude-hypoxia in vertebrates. Berlin ; New York: Springer-Verlag, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Pierre Bouverot.

Adaptation to Altitude-Hypoxia in Vertebrates. [Pierre Bouverot] -- Adaptation to altitude hypoxia is characterized by a variety offunctional changes which collectively facilitate oxygen transƯ port from the ambient medium to the cells of the body.

Bouverot P. () The Respiratory Gas Exchange System and Energy Metabolism Under Altitude Hypoxia. In: Adaptation to Altitude-Hypoxia in Vertebrates. Zoophysiology, vol Cited by: 1.

In vertebrates, much of our understanding of the acclimatization response to high-altitude hypoxia derives from studies of animal species that are. High-altitude exposure has been well recognized as a hypoxia exposure that significantly affects cardiovascular function.

However, the pathophysiologic adaptation of cardiovascular system to high-altitude hypoxia (HAH) varies remarkably.

It may depend on the exposed time and oxygen partial pressure in the altitude place. In short-term HAH, cardiovascular adaptation is mainly Cited by: 1. Adaptation to altitude-hypoxia in vertebrates / Pierre Bouverot New insights in vertebrate kidney function / edited by J.A.

Brown, R.J. Balment, and J.C. Rankin Advances in vertebrate neuroethology / edited by Jorg-Peter Ewert, Robert R. Capranica, and David J. Ingle. ing high altitude vertebrates where it has been possible to identify specific mechanisms of Hb adaptation to hypoxia.

In addition to comparative studies of Hbs from diverse animal species, functional studies of human Hb mutants also suggest that there is ample scope for evolutionary adjustments in Hb–O 2 affinity through al.

In vertebrates, much of our understanding of the acclimatization response to high-altitude hypoxia derives from studies of animal species that are native to lowland environments. Such studies can indicate whether phenotypic plasticity will generally facilitate or impede adaptation to high by: Adaptation to Hypoxia Program (established in ) is currently the longest running Program Project Grant (PPG) in the Lung Division at the NIH/NHLBI.

Part of the success of the 40 plus years of this program owes to the fact that it has continuously evolved since its inception.

The program thrives on bringing together the best scientific. Here, we review recent literature on the use of genomic approaches to study adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in terrestrial vertebrates, and explore opportunities provided by.

Adaptation to high altitude hypoxia had a pronounced antiarrhythmic effect under conditions of acute myocardial ischemia (Meerson et al., ) and attenuated the development of systemic hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats (Henley et Cited by: Adaptation to Altitude-Hypoxia in Vertebrates Adaptation to altitude hypoxia is characterized by a variety offunctional changes which collectively facilitate oxygen trans­ port from the ambient medium to the cells of the body.

Genetic analyses, in humans and other species at high altitude, have revealed signals of adaptation that confer hypoxia tolerance through potential metabolic mechanisms ().The use of other high-throughput analytical techniques, such as proteomics, metabolomics and lipidomics, have been relatively underused in studies of resident high-altitude populations compared with Author: Katie A.

O'Brien, Tatum S. Simonson, Andrew J. Murray. Phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in vertebrates.

By Jay F. Storz, Graham R. Scott and Zachary A. Cheviron. Abstract. High-altitude environments provide ideal testing grounds for investigations of mechanism and process in physiological adaptation. In vertebrates, much of our understanding of the Cited by:   In vertebrates, much of our understanding of the acclimatization response to high-altitude hypoxia derives from studies of animal species that are native to lowland environments.

Such studies can indicate whether phenotypic plasticity will generally facilitate or impede adaptation to high by: Hemoglobin Function and Physiological Adaptation to Hypoxia in High-Altitude Mammals Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Mammalogy 88(1) February with 2, Reads How we measure.

Adaptive phenotypic response to climate enabled by epigenetics in a K-strategy species, the fish Leucoraja ocellata (Rajidae) Article (PDF Available) in Royal Society Open Science 3(10) .Second, through the development of a synthesis chapter this book will serve as the cornerstone for directing future research into the effects of hypoxia exposures on fish physiology and biochemistry.

The only single volume available to provide an in-depth discussion of the adaptations and responses of fish to environmental hypoxia.in Sleep and Insomnia - Free ebook download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read book online for free.

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